Unable to connect with new version

I have a Sparkmaker LaserPro 10W and was able to connect and run the laser with version 1.06. With 1.1.01 I get waiting for connection: and if I unplug the USB cable and plug it back in, it connects, but never homes, or gives ok in the console. It runs an ESP32 chip and GRBL. It stops with this output: Waiting for connection…

ets Jun 8 2016 00:22:57

rst:0x10 (RTCWDT_RTC_RESET),boot:0x13 (SPI_FAST_FLASH_BOOT)

configsip: 0, SPIWP:0xee

clk_drv:0x00,q_drv:0x00,d_drv:0x00,cs0_drv:0x00,hd_drv:0x00,wp_drv:0x00

mode:DIO, clock div:2

load:0x3fff0018,len:4

load:0x3fff001c,len:1216

ho 0 tail 12 room 4

load:0x40078000,len:10944

load:0x40080400,len:6388

entry 0x400806b4

Message:No wifi name file!Use Default:LASERPRO

Message:No wifi Password file!Use Default:LASERPRO

Message:Laser_Pro Wifi IP address: 192.168.4.1

Message:Laser_Pro Wifi Name: Laser_Pro

Message:Laser_Pro Wifi Password: 12345678

[MSG:Axis count 4]

[MSG:Timed Steps]

I suggest you rollback to 1.0.6 and see if the problem goes away. This will isolate the problem to the upgrade or reveal that there is something else going on.

A post was split to a new topic: Custom Laser engraver ESP32 (GRBL 1.3a) not connecting

Adding @lightburn and @rick here for visibility.

They may ask you for some additional diagnostic data.

I did roll back, as it works fine. Also the crappy software that came with the laser engraver works fine. So, not a cable, not my laptop, and not the the laser.

update to 1.1.02 and still won’t connect. 1.06 works good.

here is the output from the log file:

20:11:38.046 D: “LightBurn 1.1.02” “Wed Mar 9 2022”
20:11:38.061 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:38.309 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:38.340 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:38.578 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:38.594 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:38.864 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:38.879 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:39.146 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:39.162 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:39.431 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:39.447 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:39.717 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:39.732 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:39.995 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:40.018 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:40.258 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:40.274 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:40.350 D: Enumerating ports:
20:11:40.350 D: Port: “COM3”
20:11:40.350 D: Valid Candidate: true
20:11:40.350 D: PID: 60000 VID: 4292
20:11:40.350 D: Manufacturer: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:40.350 D: Description: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:40.350 D: System Loc: “\\.\COM3”
20:11:40.350 D: Serial: “0001”
20:11:40.350 D:
20:11:40.535 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:40.537 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:40.790 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:40.792 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:41.047 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:41.050 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:41.336 D: Align output unchecked
20:11:41.336 D: EV: 1001 took 22 uS
20:11:41.336 D: Align output unchecked
20:11:41.336 D: EV: 1001 took 14 uS
20:11:41.352 D: Any ID allowed
20:11:41.352 D: Looking for port: “(Choose)”
20:11:41.352 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:41.352 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:41.352 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:41.352 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:41.421 D: “starting” busy: false state: 0
20:11:41.421 D: EV: 1001 took 20 uS
20:11:41.421 D: “LRCP USB2.0” “\\?\usb#vid_0c45&pid_6366&mi_00#8&183af011&0&0000#{e5323777-f976-4f5b-9b55-b94699c46e44}\global”
20:11:41.421 D: Unable to find camera “@device:pnp:\\?\usb#vid_0c45&pid_6366&mi_00#c&183af011&0&0000#{65e8773d-8f56-11d0-a3b9-00a0c9223196}\global”
20:11:41.421 D: EV: 1001 took 15 uS
20:11:41.421 D: EV: 1018 took 23 uS
20:11:41.421 D: EV: 1015 took 2499 uS
20:11:41.626 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:41.626 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:41.627 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:41.627 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:41.884 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:41.884 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:41.884 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:41.884 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:42.154 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:42.154 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:42.154 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:42.154 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:42.223 D: Enumerating ports:
20:11:42.223 D: Port: “COM3”
20:11:42.223 D: Valid Candidate: true
20:11:42.223 D: PID: 60000 VID: 4292
20:11:42.223 D: Manufacturer: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:42.223 D: Description: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:42.223 D: System Loc: “\\.\COM3”
20:11:42.223 D: Serial: “0001”
20:11:42.223 D:
20:11:42.424 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:42.424 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:42.424 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:42.424 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:42.678 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:42.678 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:42.678 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:42.678 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:42.937 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:42.937 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:42.937 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:42.937 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:43.204 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:43.204 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:43.204 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:43.204 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:43.474 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:43.474 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:43.474 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:43.474 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:43.744 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:43.744 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:43.744 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:43.744 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:44.007 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:44.007 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:44.007 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:44.007 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:44.276 D: Align output unchecked
20:11:44.276 D: EV: 1001 took 23 uS
20:11:44.276 D: Align output unchecked
20:11:44.276 D: EV: 1001 took 14 uS
20:11:44.292 D: Any ID allowed
20:11:44.292 D: Looking for port: “COM3”
20:11:44.292 D: – candidate port PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:44.292 D: mfr: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:44.292 D: prod: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:44.292 D: name: “COM3”
20:11:44.292 D: - found matching port name
20:11:44.292 D: Found port: PID 60000 VID 4292
20:11:44.292 D: Manufacturer: “Silicon Labs”
20:11:44.292 D: Product: “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge”
20:11:44.292 D: Name: “COM3”
20:11:44.308 D: Port open succeeded
20:11:44.361 D: “starting” busy: false state: 0
20:11:44.361 D: EV: 1001 took 17 uS
20:11:44.361 D: “LRCP USB2.0” “\\?\usb#vid_0c45&pid_6366&mi_00#8&183af011&0&0000#{e5323777-f976-4f5b-9b55-b94699c46e44}\global”
20:11:44.361 D: Unable to find camera “@device:pnp:\\?\usb#vid_0c45&pid_6366&mi_00#c&183af011&0&0000#{65e8773d-8f56-11d0-a3b9-00a0c9223196}\global”
20:11:44.361 D: EV: 1001 took 14 uS
20:11:44.361 D: EV: 1018 took 22 uS
20:11:44.361 D: EV: 1015 took 2433 uS
20:11:45.563 D: “Attempting to connect” busy: false state: 1
20:11:45.563 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:45.595 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:45.849 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:45.880 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:46.134 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:46.165 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:46.413 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:46.451 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:46.683 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:46.698 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:46.952 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:46.983 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:47.238 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:47.269 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:47.516 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:47.554 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:47.786 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:47.802 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:48.056 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:48.087 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:48.341 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:48.372 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:48.620 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:48.658 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:48.890 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:48.905 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:49.159 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:49.190 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:49.445 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:49.476 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:49.723 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:49.726 D: O: “G0\n”
20:11:49.980 D: “Connecting…” busy: false state: 1
20:11:49.984 D: O: “G0\n”

So did I pay for something I can’t use? If so, how do I get my money back? I just bought it the day 1.1 came out? :angry:

That tells me that LightBurn is pinging the LaserPro with a command (G0, followed by enter) and the LaserPro is not replying with anything, so LightBurn can’t tell if it’s there or not.

This could be a bug in the LaserPro firmware OR you have not connected it to the correct COM port. Check the drop-down list next to the ‘Devices’ button to see if there are more options, and if there are, try them each in turn while looking at the console window to see if one connects.

1 Like

Same com port I used before in 1.06 that works, and same as the laserpro software. com 3 115,200 baud. Not sure what else you need me to try?

A post was split to a new topic: Sparkmaker - not connecting

Not a Sparkmaker, not sure why you split it off to something it isn’t. And no it still doesn’t work, just stopped replying as the help isn’t helping. It would be nice to use the new version but I can’t, still not happy, but there it is.

Honest mistake I suppose. Happy to help if i can.

Please update your listing, so we can provide the most appropriate responses.

I screwed up,I am testing a setting change suggested by Markus (MMC) in another thread, and it seems to be working. I just ran a few test pieces.

1 Like

Have you tried Matt Dow’s latest Lightburn profile from April 13? He says its for use with the latest version of Lightburn (1.1.03). I don’t have Facebook and can’t get the file. If you have access, try the profile out and can you send a link to where ever he is hosting it (Dropbox, etc)?