Flooring in my house


(Loren) #1

Here’s a picture of my flooring I did for my bedroom.


(Loren) #2

and my living room.


(Josh Creswell ) #3

Mind :bomb:, I bet you could make a killing doing that. Great job!!!


(Rich) #4

Nicely done!

FYI, M.C. Escher’s works are copyrighted, and I have read that the owner of that copyright takes it quite seriously.


(Anders Troberg) #5

Wow! How long did those take?

Did you nail down the tiles? Aren’t you afraid that the nails will creep out? I’ve never seen them nailed here in Sweden, we glue.


(Karl Dunkerley) #6

Fantastic work! What kind of material did you use?


(Loren) #7

lol If i had used eschers drawing, it would have taken years to do. His are not perfect enough to tessellate in real life. I just wanted a tessellating design so I used a file that I found in a free cad warehouse. I then had to manipulate it and adjust it on all sides to make it work. I used 18,000 screws to hold them down. The whole thing took me about two months to complete. I used 6 mm birch plywood for both floors.


(Rich) #8

I am not an expert in copyright, but my understanding is that it does not have to be an exact copy for it to be an infringement. Only the copyright holder has the right to make derivatives. At any rate, I would advise anyone to look into the matter fully before using any Escher-like graphics in something other than for personal use.


(Timothy Lampe) #9

That is so cool! Monumental work!

Tim


(ric munoz) #10

{eye roll} By that logic, you’d technically have to pay royalties to Warner/Chappell Music Publishing Company every time you sang Happy Birthday at your kids bday party.


(Isaac Barbary) #11

And yet, that is how the law works. That is why restaurants don’t sing happy birthday. The Bday copyright holder sued over it. That copyright was eventually invalidated in a lawsuit but for a while no one could legally use the song.


(Allen Massey) #12

The “Happy Birthday” song is officially in the public domain.

Warner/Chappell claimed the copyright to the lyrics for the song but it turns out they were wrong and they never had a valid copyright claim at all.