Fonts and best to use for laser cutting

Just wondering what are some of the best fonts to sure when cutting out cardboard or paper so letters don’t fall out, example O, A, P so I am looking for ones that are
Thank you

There’s a ton of free fonts “out there” on the world wide interweb. Use your preferred search engine with the terms “free stencil font” and pick the one that you fancy.

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Thank you for that, I was wondering what they where called

Fonts is one of the most time consuming parts of laser work. With thousands of fonts out there, it is impossible to just pick one that will suit you or all your customers. I suggest spending a few hours researching fonts and laser a dozen or so on a piece of wood (or whatever) so that you will have them to reference and to show customers to choose from. If they don’t like what you have picked out already, have them do the research and give you choice 1 or 2 and see if you can find it for free download. If not, charge them extra for your time and charges of the fonts. Another good rule of thumb is to create the project and let them proof it before you burn it. Someone may think that they want Gothic font until they actually see it and then wonder what the heck you did. Learn from my mistakes before you make them because it is very hard to undo an expensive cutting board once it’s engraved. You need to look at stencil fonts.

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Just wondering what are some of the best fonts to sure when cutting out cardboard or paper so letters don’t fall out

Stencil type are usually like this but they often are not very attractive fonts. I came across this free one today. It is attractive compared to many but it is so “thin” that it won’t be practical in many situations unless you are doing really large output.

http://subsidiarydesign.com/stencilano/

This tool can be useful in some situations but it isn’t perfect:

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What font(s) do you fit well with a laser for those of you who have a projector? All fonts (braille font translator) used by the stencil are not very attractive or qualified. I’ve been looking for some time and typically modifies the SW pattern, but it isn’t very successful. To wonder what other people are doing.

I’ve come up with the same problem. I have found through my work that the issue is linked to the existence of true font type. Each character obviously needs to be made up of a closed loop. This closed loop ravages lasers and gravure. It is this circle. One manufacturer for whom I work uses DesignCAD to turn a true form font into a stroke. This DXF will feed and generate the component directly with its CAM tech.

I’ve been playing with a prototype of DesignCAD. In order to solve this problem, I am close to buying a copy. Of example, however, the documentation kit adds another degree of difficulty.

You’re going to want to look for single line fonts. Here’s a start.

http://imajeenyus.com/computer/20150110_single_line_fonts/index.shtml

I installed a single line font. However, LB has a funny interpretation of it. This is the word MACHINE. Is there a specific single line font that works correctly?

image

Turn off automatic welding - TrueType and OpenType don’t have the ability to represent a single line font, so the paths just reverse back over themselves.

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I have tried 6 different fonts. None of them work.

I found the CNC Vector and that works. Even with welded off some will not work. No biggie.

I have found some of the CamBam_Stick Fonts work as single line fonts.

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LightBurn has code in there to check if welding produces a dramatically different result than with it off, and if it does, it disables it invisibly. It works for most things (tested with CamBam single line fonts and a few others) but it’s not perfect. It’s a hard thing to get right.